• By recoverydirect.co.za / March 4, 2017

    Seldom is the case where an addict or alcoholic will willingly admit themselves for a first time into rehab. Family and loved ones invariably reach a crisis point with the alcoholic or addict and seek help without the knowledge or consent of the substance abuser.

    We have highlighted in numerous places on this site how addiction to substances is a disease (just like cancer or aids) it is a progressive disease (it seldom miraculously heals itself, it generally gets worse) it is fatal (sooner or later addiction kills the people).

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / January 26, 2017

    I wish I had learned the following information years ago, or had at least been more mindful of it. While I do believe it is common knowledge that alcohol is not particularly good for us, I don’t believe very many of us know just how bad it is. I myself was shocked to learn that it is a known carcinogen, and was further surprised to discover that regular alcohol consumption actually inhibits the body’s natural ability to produce crucial vitamins.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / January 9, 2017

    This is a listing of the most frequent used and abused substances in South Africa. A misconception held by many is that drug addiction is limited to illegal substances.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / December 8, 2016

    It is easy to get lost looking at addictions statistics in South Africa as there is a lot of half truth and misinformation perpetuated by commercial addiction recovery centers, government sites and the general process of protecting profit margins and taxes imposed on the alcohol and tobacco industries.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / November 7, 2016

    M.A. (Clinical Psychology)

    With a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology (1987) from the University of Stellenbosch, I started my professional career in psychology at Lentegeur Psychiatric Hospital in Mitchell’s Plain.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / November 5, 2016

    What companies’ don’t understand about addiction is that by the time it starts becoming a problem at work, every other aspect of that person’s life has already been affected.

    Loosing your job because of the disease of addiction is the last stop for people.

    Usually, finances, family and relationships have all been affected.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / October 7, 2016
  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 5, 2016

    Addiction is a chronic, progressive and often fatal disease as I came too close to finding out for myself.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 27, 2016

    My name is Ant and I am a recovered alcoholic. This does not mean I am cured-I will be an alcoholic until I die-but it does mean that the promise made in the Big Book-namely that I can “recover from a seemingly hopeless state of mind and body”-have come true. How has this happened?

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 24, 2016

    I grew up in Durban In a house over looking the Indian Ocean.

    Prone to daydreaming, I loved to get lost in fantasy and imagined places. My dog was my closest friend and humans orbited around me. At school when I encountered problems with learning, instead if asking for help I quickly worked out how to cheat.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 17, 2016

    Hi my name is _____ and I am an addict,

    I used to feel alone, I always thought something was wrong, almost like there was just something missing, sensitive and fragile while pretending nothing could touch me.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 24, 2016

    by Mike S

    From a young age, I always lived in a fantasy world. While nearly all kids play with toys, I got consumed with them. It was a world far far away where I made all the rules and all the decisions. It got so bad that my grandpa actually used to secretly clap behind me to test if I was deaf or not!

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 24, 2016

    What it was like
    I grew up as a very sensitive little boy. I spent a lot of time playing by myself. My mom brought me up. My dad worked hard and would come home late in the evenings. I would play in the garden or around the house, making up fantasies that I could live in. I always wanted others to play with, but I just had to make do. I remember it bothering me that, deep down, I knew these fantasies were not real. I would trade all my elaborate fantasies for a real friend.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 23, 2016

    My friend suggested what then seemed a novel idea. He said, “Why don’t you choose your own conception of God?” – Alcoholics Anonymous, Page 12.

    Bless Bill Wilson’s New England understatement! It’s not a novel idea. It’s a damn rip-roaring, lightning-striking, flame-throwing, earthquake-dwarfing Big Bang concept beyond anyone’s imagining.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 23, 2016

    A faith that works is a dynamic faith that provides the power needed to take the actions of recovery. It was in AA that I first encountered the notion that faith without works is dead, as the wife of one of our founder members used to repeat with great patience in the early AA gatherings.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 14, 2016

    Getting sober was the last thing I ever wanted to do.

    The very first time I drank I remember having the thought “better make sure you don’t become an alcoholic, because alcoholics can’t drink”.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / March 10, 2016

    My name is Mellony, and I am an alcoholic, drug addict, anorexia, and self-harmer, I haven’t used today though!

    Today I woke up serene.

    I had no headache, dehydration or a sore body.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / February 11, 2016

    I’ve worked with families dealing with varies disabilities, diseases and psychological issues by providing support and guidance. I come with personal experience when dealing with a family member suffering from the disease of addiction.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / February 10, 2016

    This is a standard test for individuals that think they may have a drinking related problem. Total test results with score ratings will be emailed to you on completion of the test.

    There is no obligation to this process and individuals taking this test do so with the knowledge that this does not substitute an active consultation with a councillor or addiction specialist.

    [wp_simple_survey id=”1″]


  • By recoverydirect.co.za / February 7, 2016

    Alex joined the South African Air Force in 1996 and received his pilot wings in 1997. Having served as a pilot instructor and operational helicopter pilot, he amassed over 3500 flying hours and over 1000 hours of instructional experience. A highlight of his military career is having been a wingman and Leader of the Air Forces prestigious Silver Falcons formation aerobatic team.
    Alex currently serves as a Reserve Force pilot giving pilot instruction.

    My approach to addiction recovery coaching is positive and forward moving. Instead of coaching on substance abuse as the focus, this work is aimed at bringing about productivity, stability and the enjoyment of life. In believing that my clients are creative, resourceful and whole, we can work together in an equal relationship that enables healthy and productive engagement with people, work and life.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / December 12, 2015

    Statistics say about R20 billion.

    But we can’t relate to figures like this. It’s not real. And it offers no solution for drug and alcohol addiction related destructive consequences.

    So what are the consequences – and what solution can we find to correct the problem and protect the company.

    Loss of morale, productivity and confidence
    Productivity suffers as result of increased absenteeism, sick leave, and tardiness. No shows at work on Mondays.

    Hangovers impede performance. Customer service and quality of work are casualties.

    Illegal activities increase. Addicts collude with security guards to gain access to work premises after hours and steal computers, laptops and tablets.

    Company vehicles are used to visit drug dealers and company petrol is sold to pay them. Injuries and fatal accident risks are increased.

    The disruptive employee has to go. But employee dismissal is slow and disruptive. Staff turnover and training is expensive.

    Debilitating too, is the anger and resentment that builds up when functioning staff have to cover for dysfunctional colleagues, and have to increase their work load to ensure the safety of their own jobs.

    It’s like having a member of the rugby team on the bench throughout the game.

    Bad decision-making will be costly
    Perhaps the most insidious long term and dangerously un-noticeable consequences are the bad decisions that are made whilst constantly mentally foggy. Anyone who is hung-over daily will be incapable of making good business decisions. This applies to employees at every level. From the boardroom down. Executives are paid to strategise and have to think clearly. Business is a moving target that needs constant vigilance. And this is unlikely to happen, if the hangovers, highs and lows of substance abuse – are ever present.

    I know that this is true. It’s what happened to me – and it’s how I drank away a company worth R18 million.

    My drinking progressed to the point where I was not mentally present at work and left me incapable of making good strategic business decisions. And arrogance encouraged me to make ones that had devastating consequences. Slowly the bad decision and their consequences mounted up.
    Suddenly the company was in trouble. And 12 months after being valued at R18 million it went into liquidation.

    Recovery Direct Solutions
    Sick employees, will result in a sick workplace.
    We’ll talk to your HR department. We offer free training courses on what to look for, confidential assessments and we offer practical solutions to help the employees return to health and keep your company’s productivity and bottom line where it should be.

    Vaughan is a recovering alcoholic who understands the disease of addiction and the business consequences of untreated addiction in the workplace.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / December 10, 2015

    The Fundamental Principle of Recovery

    In the same way that the Twelve Step program of Alcoholics Anonymous has helped countless alcoholics find sobriety, the same programme has come to the aid of those who struggle with compulsive eating and exercising. Using the Twelve Steps, bulimics, anorexics, and compulsive over-eaters have found freedom from their obsessive/compulsive relationship with food.

    It works for food addicts because the Twelve Steps address fundamental elements of addiction. The addictive substance or behaviour is secondary to the internal physical and spiritual struggles that foster a propensity towards addiction. In each case, the addict is unable to cope with a life that has become unmanageable.

    They are seeking an escape or a means of controlling the uncontrollable. For some this escape will come in the form of endless cocktails or a case of beer, for others the magic potion is potato chips and pie. Regardless of the drug of choice, the inner urge is the same.

    Since all addictions bear a significant similarity at their base level, they may be battled with a similar strategy. This is good news for the addict. However, despite their fundamental likenesses, alcoholism and compulsive eating are unique at a practical level. For the alcoholic, sobriety means putting the cork in the bottle. One sip is enough to send a drunk reeling, thus there is no other solution besides total abstinence from alcohol.

    In Lieu of Abstinence

    It goes without saying that total abstinence from food would be impossible. Thus compulsive over-eaters in recovery seek to identify and abstain from compulsive eating patterns.

    With the help of our trained professionals, individuals identify trigger foods and eating patterns. While food is not mind-altering in the sense that alcohol and narcotics are, any food addict could admit that refined sugars and flours have an unmistakable effect on their bodies and minds.

    Once they begin to ingest these substances, many find they cannot stop. Food addicts will also typically seek the help of a nutritionist to develop a food plan that will address their personal dietary needs. This however does not solve the problem.

    Whether a compulsive eater is an overeater, under-eater, purger, or over-exerciser (and many fall into more than one category), at their roots they are the same-they cannot eat in moderation. They lack the internal signals that indicate the proper amount to eat, when to stop and start, and which foods are best for the health of the body. Rather than a life-sustaining gift, food becomes the enemy-a tool for personal destruction.

    While counsellors will help the food addict address the practical food issues in his or her life, twelve step programs aim to go deeper. Recognizing that food addiction is a physical, mental, and spiritual disease, the program addresses the issue on each of these three levels-the same as Alcoholics Anonymous. Before the addict can begin to work the steps, the offending substance must be put in its proper place.

    For the alcoholic this means complete abstinence. For the anorexic, bulimic, or compulsive overeater, it means beginning to abstain from behavioural patterns around food that ignite the disease. Binging, purging, and food restriction come to an end. Though the addict cannot imagine this would even be possible, most are shocked to find that as soon as they become truly willing to stop, the power to do so is supplied.

    “Putting down the food” is often referred to as “Step Zero” because it precedes even the taking of the first step. With food in its proper place, the addict can commence the recovery journey.

    With the help of our programme, the addict will progress through the steps. He will learn to have relationships that don’t involve addiction. He will adapt to living in the world without compulsive eating. He will admit he has a problem that he cannot control and he will become willing to believe that a power greater than himself can help. He will look at his life and the damage his addiction has caused-both to himself and others. He will seek to make amends. His life will change. Where the world once seemed hostile and frightening, he will see that relying upon a Higher Power, he can face the world with faith, dignity and even hope. He will learn to examine his life, he will learn honesty. To continue in recovery the addict learns that the only way to keep what he has is to give it away to others. The addict will embrace service not as drudgery, but as an opportunity to once again be useful in the world. Life takes on greater meaning- food is no longer his universe.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / December 10, 2015

    A Different Kind of Alcoholic

    The word alcoholic suggests homeless, dirty, and smelly. Unemployed.  The bloke at the robot. The bag lady. The problem uncle. Someone who always drinks too much too often and whose life is falling apart because of it. Anything – but not me.

    But not all problem drinkers look like that.

    Some people think they are just fine while they abuse alcohol. The so-called “functional alcoholics” or “high-functioning alcoholics.”

    You can still be an alcoholic even though you have a great “exterior life” with a job that pays well, a home, family, and friendships.

    I know – I was one.

    A functional alcoholic might not act the way you would expect an ordinary alcoholic to.

    I was responsible and productive and worked every day. I was high achieving and powerful. In fact, my successes lead people to overlook my drinking. Or at least I was never confronted about it.

    And I was also in denial about drinking. I still owned the company, employed many people. Had social and family relationships and only drank whisky out of crystal glasses. So I was doing fine. I thought.

    But I wasn’t doing fine. No one can drink heavily and maintain major responsibilities over long periods of time. Eventually the heavy drinking caught up with me, as it will – and I lost everything. And almost lost my life.

    What Are the Signs? What is heavy drinking?

    Women who have more than three drinks a day or seven a week are “at-risk” drinkers.

    For men, the limit is four drinks a day or 14 a week.

    If you drink more than either the daily or weekly limit, you’re at risk. You’re not alone – one in four people who drink this much already has a problem or is likely to have one soon.

    Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive and fatal disease. It can’t be cured. But it can be arrested.

    Here is a link to the standard 20 questions to determine if you are a problem drinker:

    Take the test, and if you have any doubt about your drinking habits – please ask for help.

    Read Vaughan’s full story here.

    Download PDF

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / December 10, 2015

    John Hopkins University – Baltimore – USA

    1. Do you lose time from work due to your drinking?

    2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?

    3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?

    4. Is drinking affecting your reputation?

    5. Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?

    6. Have you gotten into financial difficulties as a result of your drinking?

    7. Do you turn to lower companions and an inferior environment when drinking?

    8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?

    9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?

    10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time daily?

    11. Do you want a drink the next morning?

    12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?

    13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?

    14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?

    15. Do you drink to escape from worries or troubles?

    16. Do you drink alone?

    17. Have you ever had a complete loss of memory as a result of your drinking?

    18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?

    19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?

    20. Have you ever been in a hospital or institution on account of drinking?


    If you have answered YES to any one of the questions, there is a definite warning that you may be an alcoholic.
    If you have answered YES to any two, the chances are that you are an alcoholic.
    If you have answered YES to three or more, you are definitely an alcoholic.


    “First time I saw it was on a card in book at church. Next time I saw it I was in jail.”

    Download PDF

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / November 5, 2015

    Each employee is required to attend group therapy sessions. Our suggestion is to offer a reward system – the time spent in the group session is made up by getting an extra hours work off. (The individuals in the program can also benefit by going on a retreat or team building sessions close to the end of the 6 month program to see that one can live without drugs or alcohol. To motivate persons in the workplace, continuous team building could be held so that the persons to not feel isolated from the rest of the team)

    1. Month One. One session weekly (4)
      1. Understanding the Nature of the Disease of Addiction – Its chronic – cannot be cured but can be arrested
      2. Its progressive, chronic and Its fatal
    2. Month Two. One session weekly (4)
      1. The essential elements of recovery
    3. Month Three – One session twice-monthly (2)
    4. Month Four – One session twice monthly (2)
    5. Month Five – (2)
    6. Month Six (2)

    This is a total of 16 individual sessions.

    Group Therapy Sessions and lectures will be added to make up a total of 24 sessions. These sessions will be scheduled according to the assessed needs of the programme participants.

    This programme changes the dynamic of any treatment programme that has been done in the workplace to date.

    Process Summary

    1. The company identifies the employee that’s needs to be assessed.
    2. That employee is sent to Dynamic Direct for a thorough assessment.
    3. Employee needs to be referred to a rehabilitation centre for in-patient treatment.
    4. The Case Manager (CM) makes all of the necessary arrangement, and takes the patient to the rehab.
    5. The rehab facility communicates the progress to the CM.
    6. The CM visits the patient in the rehab during his stay.
    7. On release from the Treatment Facility, or if the employee is not suited to In-patient treatment, they then enter the six months Continuum of Care Programme.
    8. The employee is required to speak to the Case Manager at least once per week, every week, for the full duration of the programme.
    9. However it must be noted that the Case Manager is available everyday, throughout the period of commitment, should the employee begin to face difficulties or experience cravings or uncertainties of how to cope in situations where alcohol and drugs are again freely available.

    NOTE: Where the patient is referred to a psychiatrist or a psychologist, that payment will fall under the medical aid benefits scheme.

    Case Management Monitoring System

    The case management system is electronically monitored at every step of the way, with the patient’s history and progress only being available to the Case Manager, and will be made available to the employer.

    Not all Rehab Centres are suitable for every patient.

    Many different kinds of people are affected by the disease of addiction – and its unrealistic to continue in the belief that every Treatment Facility is suitable for every patient:

    1. Cultural and language differences. If the patient is not functional in the de-facto language of the facility – it’s detrimental to the patient as well as the other members of the group to be forced into that situation.
    2. Some treatment facilities admit patients whose addictions have led them into criminal activities and they have serious conviction against them.
    3. Nutrition is a vital part of rehabilitation and Facilities that treat multiple addictions (drug, alcohol, food, etc) may have eating plans in place that are not suitable for everyone.
    4. Some Treatment Facilities work on extremely punitive consequences for their patients.

    Whilst it is common cause – that whatever alcoholics and addicts put before their recovery – they will loose in any case, In-Patient treatment is not always feasible:

    • Single Parents
    • Parental obligations
    • Extreme work commitments

    If in-Patient Treatment is not always feasible, the employee is compelled to attend the Six months CCP.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / February 11, 2015

    Stigmas around drug addiction cause society in general vilify illicit drug users yet stigmas cause ignore the fact that far wider reaching addictions exist in over the counter medications, prescription medications and behavioural disorders.

    Remember at some stage most illicit drugs start off a legal over the counter medications.

    To highlight this we scoured the internet to build a comprehensive list of addiction disorders commonly treated. Each was loosely validated to confirm that there were actually communities “in rehabilitation” or “recovery” and while we do concede there are some questionable topics the general point is that prescription, behaviour are considerably more prevalent.

    Comprehensive Checked List of Addictions
  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 2, 2010

    My late father was an alcoholic. My parents divorced when I was 13, after several previous attempts that started when I was 8. So I grew up in a typical dysfunctional alcoholic household.

    School was a nightmare.

    I was bullied endlessly from Primary School and through High School. Teased mercilessly and punished physically.

    All because I was “different”.

    When I found activities that I liked and where I was accepted like Ice – skating, my mother opposed it, fearing that the influence of those people would “make me gay”.

    Eventually I was kicked out of “normal” school and finished Matric at a college where it didn’t matter if you grew you hair, couldn’t play sport or acted differently.

    I passed and went into the SA Air Force.

    The bullying continued, but I became the band – leader and also started my own dance band, which found favour with the captains etc., and I became quite in demand, and entry to the band meant all sorts of privileges.

    I had been exposed to alcohol from age 13.

    And I took to alcohol like a duck to water. Looking back now, I realise that I have never been able to have just one drink, – what’s the point? And in the Air Force, I suffered consequences as a result of drinking for the first time. I got drunk one night and the result was I kept 2500 troops waiting for me to lead them onto the parade ground. Me, together with the rest of the band got put onto punishment PT, for 2 weeks. I was not popular.

    To finish off my hotel management diploma I was sent to a hotel in White River. My bar bill was higher than my weekly wages. And already I was beginning to suffer health consequences. I was 22 at the time.

    But what followed was an astonishing working career, which took me all over the world and throughout South Africa. Eventually I wanted to leave SA for Europe, because of the intolerable political situation. The day my departure I was asked to come to Cape Town for one day on a consulting job. I came for a day, and never left. That’s when my drinking escalated to being daily. And from here on the progression of my disease was rapid. I went from one bottle of wine at night to three.

    Then to three bottles plus whisky, and finally to a liter of whisky per day.

    I drank till I blacked out every night.
    I became selective as to where I would go and with whom, choosing only to go if there would be an adequate supply of alcohol. Or if the company I was keeping drank the same or more than I did. The tremors had started. I could no longer get soup onto the spoon and into my mouth. My ability to think, act rationally and function at work decreased. My sense of direction became seriously impaired. My appetite diminished and eventually I almost lost the ability to eat. Yes, I was 25kgs overweight.

    One blackout landed me in hospital, 27 stitches in my head to put it back together. I was so drunk I didn’t need an anesthetic.

    I realised that I was killing myself, but I had no idea how to stop, and never thought that it would be possible to go for one day without alcohol.

    Then another series of falls led me to a doctor, who did blood tests to determine my liver functionality. I was given six months to live. My only hope of survival was to quit the booze. I never thought it was possible and did not to know how.

    So four weeks in rehab, eight weeks in an out patient programme, and I did everything I was told to do. I became a member of alcoholics anonymous.

    • I was told to do 90 meetings in 90 days.

    • So I did 387 meetings in 365 days.

    • I got a sponsor.

    • Did service.

    • I got sponsees quite early on.

    And now I am seven years and a bit sober.

    And an addictions counsellor.

    The disease of addiction is a disease of loss.

    I lost my home; my company, my long-term relationship, all my money, my health and I nearly paid the ultimate price, by loosing my life. But almost six years later, my health is great. Despite having to live with the long-term consequences, and my life is not unmanageable as a result.

    My liver functionality is perfect.

    The tremors have stopped.

    My sense of direction is back.

    Overall – I am ok.

    Recovery is possible, for anyone who wants it.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    When an employee is suspected of having an alcohol or drug addiction problem, contact Recovery Direct’s addiction counsellors for free assistance on how to deal with situation equitably.

    We’ll do a full assessment. Free of charge and facilitate any addiction related disciplinary process that may assist the company and employee to reach a fair resolution.

    Identification & Assessment

    • Identifying the consequences of their excessive and compulsive drinking and drugging.
    • How their behaviour is affecting their job and reputation and is their job in jeopardy?
    • Is family life unmanageable?
    • Identify the progression of the drinking and drugging and level of denial.
    • A full history of the patient’s alcohol and drug use, gambling history, sex addiction.
    • Any previous attempts at stopping or at rehabilitation.

    Recovery Direct benefits recovery at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods.
    That our outpatient continuum enables employees to return to work and:

    • Become productive members of their teams.
    • Responsible family members.
    • Participate in society.
    • Leading happy and fulfilling lives.
    Employee Addiction Issues

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments. Our recovery solution has specialist interests in cocaine addiction treatment, prescription drug addiction treatment and alcohol addiction treatment.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    A returning alcoholic or addict – one who has taken treatment to heart – isn’t looking for special, preferential treatment. If anything, they want to be treated like everyone else. Many of them are keen to make a new contribution; to make the most of their second chance.

    For all that, things aren’t as they were. They’re certainly better, but also different. Recovery is not complete the moment someone comes out of treatment, but is ongoing.

    They’ll need to ease back into work; to restore their concentration, professional confidence, and regain colleagues’ respect.

    Our experience at Recovery Direct is that their return often needs some guidance. That’s why we collaborate with our network of occupational therapists, addictions counsellors, life coaches and even dieticians and exercise practitioners. Recovery is about abstinence plus some very necessary lifestyle changes.

    We like to have a back-to-work meeting with the recovering staffer, human resources, general management and anyone else they’ll work with closely.

    We discuss what happened in treatment, the follow-up phases of a 12-Step programme and life coaching (though these are unlikely to disrupt the working day, they’re vitally necessary to recovery), and any necessary changes in the work schedule like travel or supervision. For the company, it’s an opportunity to discuss future performance measurements and conduct.

    Which brings us to the question of possible relapse. Don’t let the idea scare you. It may be a once-off occurrence. The usual causes? Inadequate treatment or follow-up, physical cravings that are difficult to control, use of other mood-altering substances including prescription drugs, underlying mental or physical illness … or simply because the person got lazy or complacent.

    There are also questions that good directors and managers will ask about the company itself. Is there a drinking culture, where alcohol is the celebration or solace for success or failure? Was there something that prevented the alcoholic or addict from getting help? Are stress and long hours seen as ambitious virtues? And how can things be managed better in future? Again, Recovery Direct has the resources and insights that others may miss. Call Vaughan at 083 415 7804.

    Recovery Direct is run by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Professional Addiction Recovery Services

    Why use Recovery Direct in Disciplinary Hearings?

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / May 1, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    It’s easy to see how alcohol or drug dependence causes problems on the factory floor, or with line workers: accidents, fatal injuries, loss of production, equipment damage.

    Those terrible moments when your heart leaps, your skin goes cold. The entire company gets thrown, and takes ages to drag back to normality. But there are quieter, more insidious effects. The late nights of substance-chasing leave addicts and alcoholics with only half a mind on the job.

    Maybe it’s a hangover, or they’re tired.

    Maybe they’re thinking ahead and planning the next hit. Decision-making is bad because the drug is much more important than anything else. The moods will swing from grandiose plans and over-promise to self-pity, fear, procrastination, and under-delivery. They’ll be ratty and short with co-workers, making snide remarks and bringing morale down.

    Misunderstandings abound.

    Other workers have to step in and cover up.

    • Absenteeism and turnover is high – with higher recruitment and training costs.
    • They could be padding the expense account, or stealing more directly.
    • You could have substances hidden on your premises: alcohol, marijuana, tik, cocaine, heroin, crystal-meth.

    If you can feel a constant vibe of restlessness, irritability and discontent in the corridors, it’s likely you have some alcoholics or addicts. Research says that 1 in 10 people has a substance-abuse problem – but that doesn’t necessarily mean only a 10th of your workforce.

    It could be more.

    Firing isn’t the only answer.

    That can have worse effects on morale, as well as all the attendant costs like recruitment, training and possible unforeseen ones like CCMA and unfair dismissal rulings. (Indeed, Schedule 8 of the Labour Relations Acts says alcoholism and drug abuse are considered as forms of incapacity that fall outside of the company’s standard disciplinary code.)

    Recovery Direct can help you identify whether you indeed have a problem, and then decide what to do about it. We provide specialised treatment, where workers maintain productive lives while in the process of recovery. We design tax-beneficial payment options. We make long-term plans that benefit everyone: the alcohol, the addict, their colleagues, the company, and everyone’s families.

    Remarkably, you can turn the problem into a huge advantage.

    Call Vaughan on 083 415 7804 for a consultation. Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

    Professional Addiction Recovery Services

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 30, 2010

    The quality of the long-term program, counsellors and support network is key to establishing the right foundations to sustain long term recovery.


    Long-term addiction rehab programs can take from 120 to 180 days or longer but are designed to treat more severe cases of prescription medications, alcohol or drug addiction problems by way of extended and more structured long term addiction recovery reprogramming in patients.
    It’s no secret that after residential rehab treatment is where the hard work starts for recovering addicts. Staying clean and sober is a daunting prospect as they go back to their lives and where day to day pressures and struggles reappear constantly. It’s for this reasons that long term treatment models and staying focused on group meetings becomes an essential part of survival.

    Recovery Direct South Africa was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the treatment of long term addiction issues.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    As an employer in South Africa one of your key concerns is keeping a healthy, capable and productive workforce in operation. Substance abuse is a given variable in the workplace, in that up to 15% of the workforce may be addicted to some harmful substance or another.

    When alcohol or drug addiction reaches out of control proportions the resulting negative impacts on productivity, profitability and the mental health of your business.

    Poorly executed tasks, disciplinary hearings, absenteeism, theft and ultimately even death caused by an addiction can cause massive ripple effects in an organization that add significant stress to the business and it’s management.

    In South Africa “self identified addiction” employees or employees that go to their employer and confidentially divulge that they have an addiction problem are protected under the labour relations act. Invariably the knee jerk reaction to dealing with substance abuse in the work place or office is met with dismissals where trained staff are lost in the process and human capital is effected as the costs of training new staff and motivating remaining staff will impact the profitability of the company unless active measures are take to address these issues.

    We could lament for pages on how addiction negatively impacts the workplace the risks and threats but that’s not what you are here for. The following practical guide will help your company succeed in the face of addiction related issues.

    Recovery Direct helps employers handle these issues mindfully and constructively for all parties concerned.

    The medical fraternity, medical aids, addiction recovery experts, legislation and the recovery community at large identify addiction as a disease. When dealing with an employee on drugs or alcohol business owners would need to understand this classification for addiction in order to address the issue, mindfully and in the best interests of the company as it is legislated and for the wellbeing of the business.


    Dealing With an Alcohol or Drug Addicted Employee

    Developing a Alcohol and Drug Policy For Your Company

    According to the code employers, together with employee representatives, should develop, in writing, a policy on alcohol and drug abuse. If possible, the policy should be formulated with the help of medical personnel and other experts who have specialised knowledge regarding alcohol and drug related problems. The policy should include information and procedures on:

    • Measures to control “substance abuse” in the workplace through good employment practices

    The code advises that where it is shown that certain job situations may contribute to substance abuse the employer together with the employee representatives should identify and take appropriate preventative or remedial action. Workers and their representatives should also not formally or informally support behaviour, which incites, encourages or otherwise facilitates the harmful use of alcohol or the abuse of drugs on the premises. When an employee voluntarily discloses a previous history of substance abuse, the employer should take steps to ensure that the employee is not exposed to a working situation which might, in the past, have resulted in the employee’s problem.

    • Restriction on alcohol, legal and illegal drugs in the workplace

    The employer together with consulting parties should consider restricting or prohibiting the possession, or consumption and the selling of alcohol in the workplace. The employer should, after consultation with employee representatives, consider withdrawing alcohol as an item for expense account reimbursement or restrict it to specific situations. Employers should also be prevented from paying any wages in the form of alcohol or drugs. The above should apply to both management and workers. In those instances were medication might result in significant impairment, the employee should consult a health professional and inform his/her senior in accordance to normal procedures for absence for health reasons.

    • Prevention through information, education and training programmes

    The code advocates that employers should promote safety and health in the workplace through information, education and training programmes on the physical and psychological effects of alcohol and drug use. These programmes should be directed at all employees. The information, education and training programmes should also include the following information:

    – General and specific to the workplace laws and regulations on alcohol and drugs,
    – Suggested steps to prevent such problems from occurring, and
    – Services available to assist the employees both within and outside the workplace. This will include information on assessment and referral services, counselling, treatment and rehabilitation.

    It is recommended that managerial staff should be provided with additional training in order to assist them in identifying changes in the individual’s performance and behaviour. The training will also equip managers with the necessary skills to respond to questions regarding the company policy on alcohol and drugs. After the training, they will also be able to support a recovering worker’s needs and monitor that individual’s performance when he/she returns to work.

    Additional training should also be provided to employee representatives In order to enable them to assist employees who require help and to identify working methods or conditions that need to be changed or improved to prevent, reduce or better the management of alcohol and drug related problems. Training would further assist them in explaining and responding to questions related to company policies regarding alcohol and drugs.

    • Identification

    Identification of employees with problems could be conducted at different levels, including, self-assessment, and informal identification through a friend, family member or fellow employee and formal identification. Formal identification may include testing and should be done in accordance to the applicable laws and practices.

    • Assistance, treatment and rehabilitation programmes

    The code further suggests that employees with alcohol or drug related problems should be treated in the same manner as workers with other health problems. Therefore, workers who seek rehabilitation should not be discriminated against and should enjoy the normal benefits that are offered by an employer including the opportunity for transfer and promotion. The exceptions are in those cases where it has been identified that the employee is no longer fit to do their work. In such instances, the employer should assist the employee to obtain access to counselling, treatment and rehabilitation.

    Assistance to employees with problems could vary according to the size of the company. Small companies could assist by providing employees with the names of identified professionals and services that specialise in counselling, treatment and the rehabilitation of employees, for example, self help groups such as Alcoholic Anonymous (AA). Big companies, on the other hand, might consider the establishment of an Employee Assistance Programmes (EAP). In other instances, employees might consider establishing their own programme.

    • Intervention and disciplinary procedure

    The code additionally recommends that employers should be aware that an employee who suffers from an alcohol and/or drug problem might also be suffering from a health problem and should consider offering counselling, treatment or rehabilitation as an alternative before deciding to discipline the employee. Disciplinary rules regarding substance abuse should be communicated to employees so that they are clear in terms of what is prohibited and the type of sanctions for the violation of such rules.

    CONCLUSION

    More and more employers have established substance abuse programmes in order to respond to the problems that are created by drugs and alcohol in the workplace. These programmes save money and in some cases, they save careers, families and lives. In an effort to raise awareness about the impact of substance abuse in the workplace, the ILO implemented its code in 1995. Although dated, the code is still relevant and can assist employers develop and maintain an alcohol and drug free workplace. It is in the interest of each employer to implement such a policy, if it has not done so already. The failure to do so will continue to adversely affect one’s workplace and have a serious impact upon productivity.

    Above Excerpts from Labour Guide

    So what is the solution?

    Calling Recovery Direct we are able to determine the best course of action for your company, by understanding the legal risks of dismissal and the frameworks in which long-term viable employees can be brought into a path of recovery (without the stress and risks associated with firing staff).

    Our staff are trained in dealing with employees and employers facing addiction issues in the workplace. Recovery Direct maintains a world class residential private care program is a short term solution that can help breaking the addiction process and the long term aftercare and outpatient services address the issues of restitution to the company whilst maintaining relapse prevention through our associated national network with Relapse Prevention.

    Relapse Prevention Network

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 29, 2010

    There are more than a few companies who only hire people in recovery. And not all of them are owned by ex-alcoholics and ex-addicts. They’re run by people who have seen the benefits.

    Many claim the advantages of giving these staff a second chance in life. A FastCompany article quotes the CEO of an oil-drilling technology company, Venturetech: “There was a time I didn’t like walking through my own shop because of morale, but the grateful attitude of those in need really changed the atmosphere.”
    In the UK, Work & Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, unveiled schemes to help ex-alcoholics and drug users. “They can be motivated, highly loyal & committed workers & all the more grateful for the opportunity because of their history.”

    “An attitude of gratitude,” as it’s called in the recovery community.
    The Guardian newspaper also investigated this new phenomenon of recovery-based companies. Some of their findings? Employees are more motivated to work for a company that helps them get their lives back. They put more effort into achieving financial, social end personal stability. There’s less absenteeism, because abstinence means they won’t be partying during the week or bingeing on weekends.
    Many too, have learned new insights in rehab or through 12-step programmes. They take on values like honesty, open-mindedness and willingness – values that serve both personally and professionally. They’ve learned empathy, understanding, and better communication.

    For example, Tradition 12 of, among others, the AA and NA programmes talks of placing principles before personalities. So people in recovery talk about the issues at hand, rather than blaming others or pointing fingers. It does wonders for both efficiency and morale.

    Through the 12 Steps of these same programmes, these people learn of their own personal character traits. By knowing when they can become overbearing or dictatorial in management, they learn to give other staff more scope, professionally and creatively. They avoid the people-pleasing of over-promise, or kowtowing, or not standing their ground – all character defects which can have disastrous effects on business profitability.

    When a person admits to being a recovering addict or alcohol, they’re showing enormous strength and courage. The have a new-found inner willpower that companies are learning to harness.

    ADDICTION IN THE WORKPLACE
    It’s easy to see how alcohol or drug dependence causes problems on the factory floor, or with line workers: accidents, fatal injuries, loss of production, equipment damage…
    Those terrible moments when your heart leaps, your skin goes cold. The entire company gets thrown, and takes ages to drag back to normality.

    Gossip reigns.
    But there are quieter, more insidious effects. The late nights of substance-chasing leave addicts and alcoholics with only half a mind on the job. Maybe it’s a hangover, or they’re tired.
    Maybe they’re thinking ahead and planning the next hit.

    • Decision-making is bad because the drug is much more important than anything else.
    • The moods will swing from grandiose plans and over-promise to self-pity, fear, procrastination, and under-delivery.
    • They’ll be ratty and short with co-workers, making snide remarks and bringing morale down.
    • Misunderstandings abound. Other workers have to step in and cover up.
    • Absenteeism and turnover is high – with higher recruitment and training costs.
    • They could be padding the expense account, or even stealing more directly.

    You could have substances hidden on your premises: alcohol, marijuana, tik, cocaine, heroin, crystal-meth.
    It’s a disease (a dis-ease) that drags the whole company down, making everyone feel restless and insecure. Fears of conflict, arguments and disagreement make people tip-toe about and avoid decisions
    Sometimes, it’s only that an employee lives with an alcoholic or addict. They still bring the effects into the workplace: absenteeism, lack of focus, health problems, panicked phone calls and raised voices. There’ll be a lot of emotional manipulation, self-pity, excuses, and looking for sympathy.

    Research says that one in ten people has a substance-abuse problem. While firing a worker is often a necessary and good short-term answer, long-term results depend on having good policies … and understanding people to implement them.

    Written policies can only go so far – they do protect the company legally. But other companies turn addiction to their advantage through health benefits that offer full cover, like counselling and aftercare, for substance-abusers. They educate employees about the health and productivity hazards through wellness programmes. They implement designed programmes suitable to their exact field.

    Importantly, they reduce the stigma that prevents people from asking for help, and that leads others to protect and enable them. Read more here.

    WORKING WITH EMPLOYEES IN RECOVERY

    A returning alcoholic or addict – one who has taken treatment to heart – isn’t looking for special, preferential treatment. If anything, they want to be treated like everyone else. Many of them are keen to make a new contribution; to make the most of their second chance.

    For all that, things aren’t as they were. They’re certainly better, but also different. Recovery is not complete the moment someone comes out of treatment, but is ongoing. They’ll need to ease back in, to restore their concentration, professional confidence, and regain colleagues’ respect.

    It’s a good idea to have a back-to-work meeting with the staff-member, his or her addictions counsellor, your HR manager, and anyone else who’ll be directly involved in the daily operations. It gives everyone an idea of what went on in treatment, what the follow-up will be, and any necessary changes in the work schedule, like travel or supervision. For the company, it’s an opportunity to discuss future performance measurements and conduct.

    The employee is likely to go into some follow-up care like 12-step meeting at AA, NA or one of the fellowships. There may be other counselling sessions scheduled. Though these are unlikely to disrupt the working day, they’re vitally, absolutely, completely necessary to recovery.

    Which brings us to the nasty question of possible relapse. Don’t let the idea scare you off. It may be a once-off occurrence. The usual causes? Inadequate treatment or follow-up, physical cravings that are difficult to control, use of other mood-altering substances including prescription drugs, underlying mental or physical illness … or simply because the person got lazy or complacent. It’s a wake-up call that recovery is about abstinence plus some very necessary lifestyle changes.

    But there are also questions that good directors and managers will ask about the company itself. Is there a drinking culture, where alcohol is the celebration or solace for success or failure? Was there something that prevented the alcoholic or addict from getting help? Are stress and long hours seen as ambitious virtues? And how can things be managed better in future?

    WORKPLACE INTERVENTIONS
    “Could I have a private word with you in my office?” is the way things usually start. That can work if someone’s just going through a bad patch, or it’s a young person revelling in his new-found independence.
    But it’s lost on a true alcoholic or addict. Broken promises are actually a symptom of the condition. So is denial. Sterner medicine is needed. The company may need to take the initiative. Caring companies do.
    What is an intervention? It’s a meeting where the alcoholic or addict is suddenly confronted by his closest business colleagues, his family, and his friends. It’s going to be a bitter pill to swallow. Read more on workplace interventions here.

    So, first things first.

    A trained counsellor or facilitator really is vital – hard things will be said and there are real dangers of psychological damage.

    Also, what will the outcome be? Presumably treatment at a rehab. The booking needs to be made, and payment provided for. It needs to start immediately, if possible. (Have plans to spread the workload.)
    Schedule the meeting for any time that the alcoholic or addict will most likely be sober or clean. The minute he or she walks in, the facilitator needs to make it clear: if they walk out, it’ll have consequences – instant dismissal is just one example.

    Each family member, friend, and colleague should prepare. In a caring way, they cover four areas:

    • an example of the alcoholic or addict’s behaviour that has harmed them or caused problems.
    • the reasons why they believe the person is an alcoholic or addict.
    • why they wish the person would address the problem.
    • the consequences if he or she doesn’t, whether it be termination of employment, divorce, custody of the children, or withdrawal of friendship. (It’s important that people are prepared to follow through on these actions.)

    After this, the facilitator sums up the evidence of addiction, restates the support and concern of all present, elaborates on the consequences of not accepting help, and explains the treatment programme that has been put in place.

    Expect resistance. Denial. Excuses. Alibis. Stick to your guns. It’s for the sufferer’s own good, and for the health of the company. If he or she needs to go, so be it.
    If the intervention is successful, the treatment needs to start immediately.

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / April 28, 2010

    For employers outpatient is one of the best ways of keeping staff on the path of recovery whilst still maintaining the presence at the office or workplace. Outpatient services enable the patients to still go to work and lead a functional lifestyle whilst attending recovery meetings after hours.

    Company Sponsored Outpatient
    Sponsoring outpatient services for employees sets a great precedent for any company in the mindful treatment of addiction in the work place. Sponsored outpatient programmes for employees demonstrate that the company cares about the wellbeing of their staff (in the workplace and out) and is willing to help and support with the resolution of an issue that would otherwise be a hard personal journey.

    Work Place Addiction Issues
    Dealing with workplace addiction is a hard task. Recovery Direct are ideally suited to help your company establish viable addiction policies and protocols to ensure your company is complicit to local legislation on addiction as a recognised disease and to help you through office interventions and dealing with addicted employee issues in an affordable and mindful continuum of care based treatment model.



    Addiction Clinics Services
    Substance Abuse
    Not limited to alcoholism, anti-anxiety medication, cocaine rehab, cannabis, MDMA, heroin and methamphetamine drug addiction problems.
    Behavioral Addictions
    Not limited to gambling, eating, spending, sex & porn disorders.

    Speak to Recovery Direct

    Call 079 235 7415

    Recovery direct has many decades collective experience in successfully handling addiction disorders.

    Chat to one of our counselors today about how we can help you find your new direction.

    Recovery Direct was formulated by Vaughan Pankhurst and the Recovery Direct team to address the fundamental shortfalls in dealing with addiction in the context of professional workplace environments.

  • By recoverydirect.co.za / February 1, 2010

    PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) іѕ the оnѕеt оf a specific set of symptoms in response to аn еxtrеmе traumatic event іn one’s lіfе. It іѕ nоt necessary for thе trаumаtіс еvеnt tо bе реrсеіvеd аѕ еxtrеmеlу trаumаtіс fоr еvеrуbоdу. Which basically means thаt as we hаvе dіffеrеnt tolerance tо раіn, соld, heat аnd hunger we have a dіffеrеnt tоlеrаnсе fоr еxtrеmе trаumаtіс еvеntѕ.

    Thе disease is gender-independent, аffесtіng bоth mеn and wоmеn оf аll аgеѕ. Thе causes of post trаumаtіс ѕtrеѕѕ disorder, аѕ well аѕ the еvеntѕ lеаdіng tо іt, аrе just аѕ vаrіеd. PTSD in сhіldrеn аnd adults can result from trauma durіng сhіldhооd, ѕuсh as children іn abusive homes.

    Victims оf rаре, аѕѕаult, оr abuse саn develop PTSD duе to thеіr trаumаtіс еxреrіеnсеѕ. Sосіаl wоrkеrѕ, emergency ѕеrvісе workers, members of thе military, аnd mаnу others’ occupations аlѕо еxроѕе thеm to such trаumаtіс еvеntѕ.

    PTSD has been a major problem for addicted patients over the years, and is going to become a bigger problem over time based on the large number of individuals that have been through traumatic experiences in South Africa and have begun to self medicate using addictive substances such as alcohol, cocaine, dagga.

    However, diagnosis for PTSD is growing based largely off large scale studies conducted in the United States and war veterans that experience traumatic events and land up needing psychotherapeutic outlets that have led to the progression of numerous remedial processes that are professionally available to individuals suffering from the effects of trauma.

    In modern society and with the advent of technology, has rapidly jolted insights and treatment for mood disorders in patients. PTSD research has further jumpstarted an entire new facet or treatment on the very key drivers that underlie addictions in patients.

    So what treatments or remedies that is available for suffers of PTSD?

    Psychotherapy

    Some of the forms of therapy are to be had for suffers of post traumatic stress, and whilst in the past many people have been reticent about ‘seeing a shrink’, therapy is still one of the best ways to tackle this condition.

    It is ideal to enter one-on-one or a group therapy programmes that focus on post traumatic stress relief techniques.

    Joint or group therapy has benefited many people facing either mental or physical situations and the strength of connecting with people who have been through comparable experiences should never be underestimated.

    Some types of therapy that utilise PTSD treatment include

    Exposure Therapy

    That is a behavioral therapy approach that will help you resist the things that you find scary so you can learn to deal with it.

    Cognitive Therapy

    Talking approximately self-destructive mind and what reasons this may help you develop techniques to change those notions.

    Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR).

    This looks like an uncommon method, but combining Exposure Therapy with a programme of guided eye actions can assist patients deal with traumatic memories. That is because there is a robust connection between eye motion and the function of the memory.

    A mixture of those processes will probably be the high-quality route, and operating together with your healthcare professional ought to allow you to locate the best approach method for you. Simply keep in mind that there is no need to cope with the signs of PTSD on your own and effective treatment could have a big difference on the quality of your life.

    Medication

    One of the most commonplace symptoms of PTSD is problem of getting a sound asleep, which may be a prime trouble and have a disruptive effect on one’s potential to pay attention and focus. A drug called Prazosin is regularly prescribed for nightmares and has been used for a long time within the remedy of hypertension.

    Anxiety and depression is another common issue and plenty of tablets are to be had to deal with those symptom. Bear in mind with any medication is that side-effects are often associated with their addictions and dependency, which can also come to be a standing problem.

    Working carefully along with your doctor will to help you locate the right medicinal drugs and control any side-effect that is experienced. Preferably, medicine will help you out within the short-term and route into more sustainable and natural treatments.


    Recovery Direct addiction treatment centre in South Africa, has been established by to offer a medically proven treatment to suffers of PTSD and help them connect with other people affected by the condition. If you think you may be suffering from PTSD you should visit their website now for more info about PTSD treatment, you are better able to tackle or cope with a problem with more understanding.

    Recognising PSTD

    The signs аnd symptoms muѕt соntіnuе for mоrе thаn 30 days fоr a PTSD dіаgnоѕіѕ. If these ѕуmрtоmѕ last lеѕѕ tіmе, thаn thеу may rаthеr bе signs of acute ѕtrеѕѕ disorder. Thе lеngth оf time аftеr thе traumatic еvеnt bеfоrе thеѕе ѕуmрtоmѕ оnѕеt dо nоt negate thе роѕѕіbіlіtу fоr PTSD, оr make thе еmоtіоnѕ or еxреrіеnсеѕ аnу lеѕѕ vаlіd. The durаtіоn оf роѕt traumatic stress disorder’s ѕуmрtоmѕ lіkеwіѕе do nоt invalidate thе ѕеrіоuѕnеѕѕ of thе illness, оr thе events еxреrіеnсеd. DSM-IV dеfіnеѕ acute роѕt-trаumаtіс stress dіѕоrdеr as lasting lеѕѕ than thrее mоnthѕ, сhrоnіс роѕt-trаumаtіс stress dіѕоrdеr аѕ lаѕtіng thrее months or mоrе, and dеlауеd-оnѕеt роѕt-trаumаtіс stress disorder as whеn symptoms оf PTSD оссur six mоnthѕ оr mоrе аftеr thе trаumа.

    Symptoms

    Pеrѕіѕtеnt рrеоссuраtіоn wіth thе traumatic еxреrіеnсе аffесtіng dаіlу lіfе Dіѕѕосіаtіоn – еmоtіоnаl numbnеѕѕ, a perceived disconnection between соgnіtіvе thought and thе bоdу or еmоtіоnаl ѕtаtе Increased аrоuѕаl – such as hyper-vigilance, іnѕоmnіа, difficulty ѕtауіng аѕlеер, оr аngеr іѕѕuеѕ Flashbacks – rесurrіng drеаmѕ rеvоlvіng аrоund the trаumаtіс еxреrіеnсе, flаѕhbасk mеmоrіеѕ, іntеnѕе rеасtіоn to any rеmіndеr оf thе trauma experienced Dерrеѕѕіоn – fееlіngѕ оf hopelessness, lоw ѕеlf-еѕtееm, аnd dіffісultіеѕ іn previously established rеlаtіоnѕhірѕ.

    Treatment

    Thеrе аrе several thеrаріеѕ аnd medications аvаіlаblе. Hоwеvеr, thеrе іѕ nо single rесоvеrу plan tо deal wіth rеасtіоnѕ to trаumа, nоr іѕ there аnу one-time сurе tо “gеt оvеr” PTSD. A рrеlіmіnаrу appointment wіth a psychiatrist саn hеlр wоrk out іndіvіduаl PTSD therapy орtіоnѕ. Mеdісаtіоn tо help rеgulаtе thе ѕуmрtоmѕ іѕ аvаіlаblе, аѕ wеll as psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Thеrару (MBCT).

    Post trаumаtіс stress dіѕоrdеr must be rесоgnіzеd fоr whаt іt іѕ: аn аnxіеtу rеlаtеd соndіtіоn that can and muѕt be trеаtеd. Lіfе іѕ a precious соmmоdіtу and is mеаnt tо be lived tо іtѕ fullеѕt.


    Addiction Clinics Services
    Substance Abuse
    Not limited to alcoholism, sleeping / anti-anxiety pills, cocaine, cannabis, ecstasy, heroin and methamphetamine drug addiction problems.

    Process Addictions
    Not limited to gambling, eating, spending, sex, porn disorders.


    Multidisciplinary addiction treatment counselors operating from the best rehabs in South Africa.
    Treatment Programmes

    Specialists in new patient assessments, private & workplace interventions and multi-substance addiction cases.


    Take the first step to a new life with us and be inspired to make meaningful and positive changes in your life.
    Contact Recovery Direct

    Call +27 64 739 5165

    Recovery direct has many decades collective experience in successfully handling addiction disorders.

    Speak to one of our counselors today about how we can help you find your new direction.


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